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Editorial

Dr Manesh Lahori

Authors : Dr. Manesh Lahori

On 6th April 2016, the number of people living with diabetes has quadrupled since 1980. About 422 million people are suffering from diabetes. Thus, WHO marked World Health Day on 7th April 2016, as an action on Diabetes.

The main goal of this world health day 2016 campaign is to increase the awareness about the rise in diabetes, and its staggering burden and consequences. It signifies steps to prevent, diagnose,care and treat patients with diabetes should be taken.

Periodontal diseases have been proposed as the sixth most prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus following the other diabetic complications.Oral fungal, bacterial infections and periodontitis are more frequent and severe in patients with poor glycaemic control. Oral mucosa lesions in the form of stomatitis, geographic tongue, benign migratory glossitis, fissured tongue, traumatic ulcer, lichen planus, lichenoid reaction and angular chelitis. In addition, delayed mucosal wound healing, mucosal neuro-sensory disorders, xerostomia, dental caries and tooth loss are also more prevalent in patients with diabetes.

It is also essential to understand the way diabetes affects oral health that is necessary for proper maintenance of the overall health. The need for regular follow-up of patients with diabetes mellitus by both dentist and physicians as the major role is played by dentists in recognising the main oral signs and symptoms of diabetes.

A large proportion of diabetes cases are preventable. Simple lifestyle measures have been shown to be effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. Maintaining normal body weight, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet can reduce the risk of diabetes.

Diabetes is treatable. Diabetes can be controlled and managed to prevent complications. Increasing access to diagnosis, self-management education and affordable treatment are vital components to be able to fight the battle against diabetes.
 

Editor

Dr. Manish Lahori
Dr. Manesh Lahori
B.D.S, M.D.S, F.I.S.O.I, F.I.C.O.I
Professor & H.O.D
Dept. of Prosthodontics
K.D Dental College, Mathura, India